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Most Popular Dog Breeds in the World

Top 10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in the World

Are you curious to know the most popular dog breeds in the world?

Do you want to know what are the most loved dog breeds and if there is one that is right for you?

For many owners, dogs are more than just a pet, they are part of the family.  That’s why choosing the right breed of dog for you shouldn’t be a hasty decision.

You must read all the facts before making a selection.  And to help you do just that, we’ve put together some interesting information on the many famous dog breeds that you can choose from.

Take a look at this amazing infographic we’ve created for you and find out more about each bread below:

The German Shepherd

The German Shepherd is currently listed as the third most popular dog breed registered with the AKC.  This dog resembles that of its ancestor, the Wolf, and was originally bred to be the ideal hurting Shepherd and guard dog.

Although this breed went through several name changes during World War I, mainly due to its German heritage, it was officially renamed the German Shepherd and recognized by the AKC in 1931. And while its popularity ranking is down just a bit, it has been a top choice as a family companion for generations.

German Shepherds score very high in terms of protection ability, watchdog status, and training adaptability.  Although playfulness and affection do not rank as high as other dog breeds, the German Shepherd is actually a perfect choice for a family pet.

This dog is extremely protective of its home, as well as members of the family. He is considered aloof and a bit suspicious of strange people and other animals.  However, they can be tamed and gentle around children and other house pets.

Upkeep And Maintenance

As far as upkeep is concerned, German Shepherds need mental and physical challenges on a daily basis.  With the ability to learn new tricks and obedience lessons, this dog is extremely intelligent.  Physical activity must also be a part of this dog’s daily life.  Long walks and running outside is ideal.

Health Information

What it comes to health issues, there are two concerns that you need to know about: CHD and elbow dysplasia.  Minor health concerns which occasionally strike the German Shepherd are skin allergies, hemangiosarcoma, malignant neoplasms, cataracts, elbow dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy, gastric torsion, and hot spots.

The lifespan of the average healthy German Shepherd is anywhere between 10 and 12 years.  This is based on a dog who remains healthy and is active throughout its lifetime.  Specific health tests suggested by veterinarians for German Shepherds are elbow dysplasia and hip dysplasia.

History

The German Shepherd emerged from Karlsruhe, Germany in 1899; Captain Max von Stephanitz was the main breeder trying to refine a dog into the German Shepherd. These dogs were created from pronominal breeds of farm and herding canines. The initial dog shown in the United States was seen in 1907.

This breed has benefited from movies and shows with German Shepherd stars such as the Roy Rogers Show, Rin Tin Tin, and Radio Flyer that helped these canines gain enormous popularity.

General Looks

A nimble, powerful, and well-muscled look is the initial impression of a solid German Shepherd. He is vigilant and lively. He has good balance; his forequarters and hindquarters are developed symmetrically. He has more length than height, his body is deep, and he appears curved, not angular. He looks hearty when resting or moving. The German Shepherd has a noble bearing.

The male and female definitely have the mark of masculinity or femininity; that is, the secondary sex characteristics are prominent.

Is This Your Breed?

This is a high-energy dog that likes fun. He adores children that he gets to know well. He is a faithful friend and a good family dog. He needs consistent exercise and grooming.

Height, Ratio, Essence

Males should be 24-26 inches at the crest of the shoulder blade and females 22-24 inches. The wanted ratio concerning the dog being longer than he is tall is 10-81/2. The length is measured, starting at the breastbone going to the hind tip of the pelvis. It is a measurement concerning the general length in proportion to the height. It does not concern a long back but is measured from the side appearance.

Coat

The perfect specimen’s coat is medium in length and double coated. The exterior coat is thick, straight-haired, coarse, and hugs close to the dog’s body. A barely wavy, wiry outer coat is allowed. The dog’s legs, paws, inside ear, and fore-face are lined with short fur. Neck hair is thicker and longish. The back of the forelegs and hind-legs have a little more longish fur that carries to the pastern and hock. These are coat errors: downy, sleek,  overly long exterior coat, and wool-like, kinky, and open coat.

Color

There is a variety of German Shepherd colors and the majority are allowable, though a white canine is not qualified. Powerful, deep colors are the preference. The dire errors are blues, livers, and the light faded color.

Locomotion

The German Shepherd is a jogging canine. It is structured for its labor. The gait stretches out, is fluid, and appears without effort. It is a flowing and cadenced gait. Its tread gains the supreme amount of ground utilizing the least steps. Its strides are lengthy when walking and when trotting. The paws are always near the ground. It has great muscles and ligaments that achieve its moving ability.

The hindquarters push and elevate the dog’s body surging it forward. If there isn’t any crab-like motion in the manner the dog moves, then the gliding by of one hind-paw on the inside and the other on the outside of the front paw’s path isn’t a fault.

Personality

This breed has a distinctive look that exudes confidence. It is unafraid and has a distant aspect that takes the person approaching the friendship first. It will meet friendly overtures in kind. It has posed, but can be enthusiastic and attentive. If the dog shows any tendency to be shy, it will get a penalty. Biting is a disqualification, as the judge needs to look at the teeth.

The Labrador Retriever

The Labrador Retriever is currently listed as the number one registered dog with the AKC. This dog breed is ranked very high by dog enthusiasts on all levels; playfulness, friendliness towards strangers and pets, easy to train, affectionate, and even makes a great watchdog.

This breed was officially recognized by the English Kennel Club back in 1903, and then by the AKC in the year 1917. Amazingly, the Labrador Retriever was voted the most popular dog breed of 1991 and has continued to reign atop the charts even today.

When these dogs are trained they are very amiable and obedient. They are especially wonderful around kids, as they have high tolerance levels towards children and their antics. This dog has its moments of being very calm around the house, yet can become intense and energetic in the blink of an eye when stimulated.

The Labrador Retriever is extremely loyal to its owner and is eager to please.  It enjoys learning new tricks and is a wonderful student of obedience training. Swimming, running, and retrieving are all activities that this dog breed enjoys being a part of.  Being challenged mentally and physically is desired by the Labrador retriever.

Upkeep And Maintenance

The Labrador Retriever must have daily exercise in the form of running and swimming.  Retrieving, however, is at the top of the list of fun games that Labs really enjoy, especially through water such as the beach or even a large outdoor swimming pool.

These dogs can either live indoors where it’s warm and cozy, or remain outdoors during all types of weather. Be sure to adhere to common sense safety rules when keeping your lab outside during the hot humid months, or the chilling winter temperatures. However, like most dogs, a Labrador Retriever would prefer to be inside with its family and stable temperatures.

Health Information

The Labrador Retriever has an average lifespan of ten to twelve years in general. This is, of course, depending upon the health of the animal.  Major health concerns that should be looked at are elbow dysplasia, CHD, OCD, patellar luxation, and obesity. Occasionally, some health issues spring up throughout the Labrador Retriever breed such as diabetes, tricuspid valve dysplasia, over-exercise (leading to collapse), distichiasis, and muscular dystrophy.

History

Labs came from Newfoundland. They were working dogs for fishermen. Labs aided in hauling in fishing nets and grabbed fish that got off of fishing lines. They interbred with Spaniels, Setters, and other types of Retrievers. The dogs that became Labs grew into skilled hunting dogs.

General Looks

Labs are stoutly built and of medium size. They are athletic and well proportioned hunting dogs that retrieve game and waterfowl. The definable characteristic of the breed is the “otter tail.” They are bred to withstand difficult terrain and weather. It is paramount that a Lab is structurally balanced and strong, since the intention for breeding it was to create a good working dog.

Labs have a short, thick coat that resists water. The Lab’s head is clearly outlined. Its rear skull is wide. The stop is moderate. It has strong jaws. The eyes are affable.

Is This Your Breed?

The Lab is fond of sports and makes a good dog for a family or individual that likes physical activities. It’s the perfect pet for a hunter.  It needs consistent grooming for its double coat. It’s very teachable. It has a good, relaxed temperament.

Height, Ratio, Essence

Height: The withers height for a male is 22 ½ -241/2 inches and for the female is 21 1/2-23/1/2 inches. If a male or female is more than ½ over or under the height limit it is disqualified. The male should weigh 65-80 pounds and the female 55-70. These height and weight regulations are applicable to Labs 12 months old or older.

Ratio: The ratio of the Lab’s body parts to each other is all-important. Certain proportions are applicable to a Lab with a balanced body structure. The dog must be coupled short. From the tip of the shoulder to the tip of the rump must be equivalent or a little longer than the line from the withers to the ground.

The line from the elbow to the ground has to be ½ the height of the withers. The brisket must go to the elbow, though not visually deeper. The body’s length has to allow an adequate, free stride, the dog should not seem low to the ground or his outline or legs overly long. The dog’s proportion and mass should have a general balance. An animal that seems not husky enough or clumsy isn’t good examples for showing. The animal should not be fat.

Coat

The coat is an unmistakable quality of the Lab. The perfect coat is short, thick, and straight. When touched it should feel somewhat hard. The undercoat is downy and resists water. It shields against cold, water, and ground cover. The back can be barely waved. Causes for coat penalization are wool-like, silk-like, or thin sleeky ones; they are atypical of Labs.

Color

The pigments for the Lab’s coat are Chocolate, yellow, and black. Other colors or combinations disqualify the dog. A tiny white space on the dog’s chest is allowed, not wanted. Aged white fur isn’t bringing nor from scars.  Black dogs are totally black, with no tan or brindle marking, which disqualifies.  Yellow has a range of fox-red to pale cream. The back, ears, and underside can have shade variations. Chocolate shading goes from pale to rich. Tan or brindle marks disqualify.

Locomotion

The Lab’s locomotion is agile and unrestrained. No out elbows when dog approaches. The legs aren’t overly close to each other. Arrow forward motion, no pacing nor weaving and movement is in consistent plane. In hind view, legs should be in line with front. Hocks should flex correctly looking strong. Side view shows shoulders in free and easy locomotion.

The extending foreleg is close to the ground. Crucial problems are: paddling, which means posterns aren’t strong, knee movement too high or chopped,  means shoulder straight, and assembled straight shown by stiff hind gait. Reasons for penalties are jerky locomotion, writhing, overly high knee movement, moving sideways, and crossing over.

Personality

It is easy going, but assertive and enjoys making it’s master happy. It isn’t hostile to people or other animals. The Lab is smart, sociable, and adapts well. Its temperament is the trademark of the breed.

The Golden Retriever

The Golden Retriever is extremely popular among dog owners, especially in the United States.  This dog breed is currently listed as the number two most popular registered dog with the AKC. This is not surprising, however, due to the fact that the Golden Retriever maintains the following qualities: high affection levels, friendliness towards strange people and other foreign animals, very easy to train, and always playful.

were officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in the year 1927.  Initially valued for its hunting abilities, it soon became an extremely popular household pet, obedience competitor, and show dog winner.

This dog is known as “everyone’s friend” and is widely appreciated for its companionship towards the family. Golden Retrievers are highly physical animals and have been known to lead towards behavior problems when there is a lack of activity.  Poor breeding practices have produced Golden Retrievers who are overly boisterous and excitable when left in the house.  However, a properly bred Retriever is one that will remain calm when trained, yet energetic when given the opportunity to play outside.

Upkeep And Maintenance

The upkeep of the Golden Retriever must include daily physical exercise.  Runs through the sand, long walks on the leash, and of course retrieving games are all highly recommended to keep this animal happy.  Human interaction and social events are also desired by the Golden Retriever.

This dog can live both indoors and outdoors.  However, indoor living is what best suits the Golden Retriever.  Because of its need for human interaction and companionship, it is best to make room for your Retriever inside the house so that he can love and be loved by the rest of family as much as possible.

Health Information

If you own a Golden Retriever or plan on raising one from puppyhood, major health concerns that you should know about are various skin problems (such as hot spots, ear infections, and allergies), CHD, lymphoma, and hemangiosarcoma.  Minor issues include hypothyroidism, elbow dysplasia, potential eye disorders, mast cell tumors, and seizures.

Golden Retrievers have a lifespan of up to 13 years when living a life of good health.  Veterinarians suggest that these dogs be specifically tested for thyroid, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, cardiac issues, and potential eye problems.

History

The Golden Retriever hails from the Highlands of Scotland. This dog emerged as a bred during the 19th century. It was mainly a hunter. Lord Tweedmouth set out to produce a dog that was conformed to the Scottish weather, bailiwick, and local game of the area. Tweedmouth bred a yellow Retriever t with a Tweedwater Spaniel; this bred no longer exists. He went on to intermix the Bloodhound and Irish Setter with his specimens to achieve the Golden Retriever.

General Looks

This is a strong, energetic, solid, and well-developed dog. It is agile and its legs aren’t overly longish. These canines are enthusiastic, attentive,  self-assured, with a good-hearted expression. Show this dog in strenuous working circumstances. The total looks, poise, gait, and aim are emphasized over the dog’s several factors. Any retreat from the superlative description is a fault in the gradation of interference it causes to the breed’s aim or contradicts its nature.

Is This Your Breed?

This is a Sporting breed; it is lively and enthusiastic. It needs exercise each day. It can live in various environments. It has a water resistant double-coat that requires habitual brushing. The shedding is seasonal. His personality is friendly and his color arresting.

Height, Ratio, Essence

The males are 23-24 inches high upon withers and females 21 ½-22 ½. There is a proportion penalty for animals one inch over or beneath the standard. The length commencing at the breastbone traveling to the tip of the buttocks is barely more than the withers height; the ratio is 12:11. The weight of males is 65-75 pounds and females 55-65.

Coat

The coat is thick and repels water. It has a hearty undercoat. The outer coat is stiff  and buoyant, though not rough or silk-like. It knits to the body and can be curly or straight. There should be a ruff without trimming and a modest feather-like look upon foreleg’s back and under-body. The neck’s front, thigh’s back, and tail’s underside should feather more heavily. These aren’t wanted: extreme length, bendy and open coats, and downy coats. The feet can be trimmed and sporadic fur tidied. The normal outline of the coat shouldn’t be changed.

Color

A deep, glossy, golden hue varying in shades is the norm. Hairs that feather can be paler than other parts of the coat. White or gray fur besides that from age is penalized, excepting sa mall amount of white fur on chest. Don’t confuse acceptable pale shading with white fur. Very dark or light fur in prominence on dog’s body is not wanted. Evident off-color or black fur is a crucial fault. Some leeway is recommended for pups having pale coloring, which promises capacity to become richer as pup matures.

Locomotion

When the dog is running, the pace is free, even, strong, and highly coordinated. Seen from any stance, the legs should not roll in or out and the paws should not hinder or transverse one another. When the dog’s sped escalates, the paws should meet at the center point of equilibrium.

Personality

The personality should be sociable, steadfast, and dependable. A dog that is hostile with other dogs or people within ordinary conditions is not an example of the wanted Golden Retriever personality. A nervous or shy example is also to be given a penalty corresponding to the impact of the fault.

The Bulldog

The Bulldog is one of those breeds that carries a mean-looking facial expression but is actually a delight to have as a pet. This dog was originally bred to attack bulls, literally. History has it that these ferocious little guys used to attack and bite the nose of large bulls in the ring for entertainment purposes. Luckily today, the Bulldog is just an everyday house pet. 

Despite its angry looking face, these dogs are extremely amiable and mellow. The Bulldog is well behaved around children and tends to thrive on pleasing its owners. Although he can be protective of its owner and a little aggressive towards strange dogs, this breed makes a great family companion and will get along just fine with other pets in the home. 

Upkeep And Maintenance 

When it comes to upkeep and maintenance of the Bulldog, moderate exercise should be given on a daily basis, such as a brisk walk through the park at least once or twice daily. This is definitely not the type of dog that is made for running. The Bulldog is quite docile and tends to prefer a slower pace. 

Although the Bulldog can live both indoors and outdoors, it is recommended that he remain inside with the family as much as possible. These dogs cannot stand hot weather and are not good with water. In fact, Bulldogs do not know how to swim. 

Grooming the Bulldog takes a little extra care, but only around the face wrinkles and other folds located around the tail. These areas should be cleaned moderately on a daily basis. Other than that, a light brushing over the rest of the coat, once or twice weekly, is all that is needed. 

Health Information 

There are some major health concerns that you need to be aware of when owning a Bulldog. They include stenotic nares, shoulder luxation, ventricular septal defects, CHD, internalized tail, and elongated soft palate. Occasionally you might come across urethral prolapse and vaginal hyperplasia. 

The lifespan of the Bulldog can reach up to 12 years, sometimes longer. Specific health tests that are recommended by veterinarians include testing for elbow problems, hip dysplasia, need dysplasia, and potential eye problems. Also, wheezing, snoring, and lots of drool is typical with every Bulldog. 

History

Bulldogs are thought to have their origins in Britain. They were used for bull baiting, which is a sport, wherein, the Bulldog grabs a bull by the nose and doesn’t let go. Hence, the name of this breed is derived from this sporting use. The initial Bulldog was a fierce animal with a high pain tolerance. Parliament made bull baiting illegal in 1835.

The breeders of Bulldogs, thus, started breeding the ferocious characteristics out of  the breed. After several generations, Bulldogs were a robust lot with a pleasant personality.

General Looks

The flawless example of a Bulldog is a sleek coated animal and medium build. It has a hefty, deep chest, and the body is slung low. Its head is huge with a small face. The shoulders are wide and the legs durable.

Is This Your Breed?

These are excellent family dogs because they have enduring attachments to kids. They are tender and protective. They need a little exercise and a bit of grooming. They get overheated easily in hot weather and need shade. Their brief noses are the cause of getting hot so easily.

Weight,  Ratio, Essence

The male weighs around 50 pounds and the female 40. The perimeter of the head from the ear’s front should be at least the dog’s height upon his shoulders. The dog’s points should have a fine proportion and nothing should appear in bad form. The features shouldn’t be excessive, thus attaining a misshapen-ed look. The female will not appear as robust and should be given this thoughtfulness.

Coat Plus Skin

The Bulldog’s coat is shiny, sparing, close-knit, fine-textured, and straight. It should not be feather-like, fringe-like, or curly. The appropriate skin is supple and moveable. This is particularly true of the neck, shoulders, and head. The dog’s head and face are creased bountifully and he has a dewlap. That means overhanging fleshy folds are positioned from the jaw to the chest.

Color

The coat is undeviating, dazzling, and unadulterated. The desired colors in the favored order are:

– red brindle
– additional brindles
– unbroken white
– unbroken red, fawn, fallow
– piebald
– substandard colors of the previous

A piebald that is seamless is favored over a damaged solid or a mucky brindle. Solid black isn’t wanted, though solid black spots mixed with piebald areas isn’t as unfavorable. Flawless brindles are mixed well in the contained colors. A tiny white spot on the chest is okay for brindles. For piebalds, the white has to be clearly delineated, symmetrical, and untainted color.

Locomotion

The gait is robust, with a rolling action that is a specific feature of the Bulldog. But the walk is sideways, scuffled, and loose.

Personality

He is placid, affectionate, and brave. He has a dignified attitude.

The French Bulldog

The French Bulldog was extremely popular in England during the 19th century, particularly around the area of Nottingham. Most of these dogs were very small, weighing in at less than 25 to 30 pounds. They made their way to France when a large number of lace workers headed to the area for work and brought their small toy Bulldogs with them.

The Frenchwomen absolutely adored these little dogs, specifically the ones that had erect ears. This feature of the ears were very common, but most people did not like this look back in England. Soon enough, many more of these clown-like looking dogs were brought to France by dog dealers, which were referred to as Bouledogue Francais.

As their popularity grew, the breed had caught the attention of wealthy families throughout the entire upper class. You could find French Bulldogs in some of the most prestigious homes throughout France. It was during this same time period that American travelers who were visiting France brought several Bulldogs back to the United States and began breeding them.

Soon an entire American club was created for this doog and 1898 they had sponsored one of the most popular and elegant dog shows that was ever displayed. This dog show was specifically for French Bulldogs and had attracted large numbers of wealthy spectators which helped the breed’s popularity skyrocket in America. Their popularity among the rich continued to soar and the French Bulldog was rated the most popular show dog in the United States in 1913.

Personality

The French Bulldog is a fun-loving, clownish lapdog that enjoys playtime and being the center of attention. They love to cuddle and curl up next to you. These dogs are extraordinarily sweet, willing to please and make great companions for anybody. They are slightly stubborn when it comes to training but once conditioned through obedience lessons, French Bulldogs can make great trainees.

Taking Care Of Your French Bulldog

French Bulldogs are quite small and like most toy-sized dogs, physical exercise can be met through a nice walk on the leash or a romp through the house. These dogs do not do well in hot weather but can take the cold if necessary. This is one breed that should be living indoors at all times. Also keep in mind that these dogs tend to wheeze, snore, and drool. Grooming care is minimal, with the occasional brushing once weekly. However, facial wrinkles should be cleaned on a daily basis.

Health Information

The average lifespan of a healthy French Bulldog is between 9 and 12 years. Major health issues include CHD, intervertebral disk disease, brachycephalic syndrome, and allergies. Minor problems that come up are hemivertebra and patellar luxation.

History

In the middle of the 19th-century lace workers from Nottingham, England went to France for work. Their English Bulldogs traveled with these workers. Though these dogs weren’t as popular in England, they were extremely well received by the French. They were welcomed as lapdogs for rich French women, who liked this toy bulldog that sported pointy ears.

Another theory says that this breed originated from the Chincha Bulldog of ancient Peru. The French Bulldog came to the United States in 1896 and debuted in New York at the Westminster Kennel Club’s show.

General looks

It is a compact, toy, and muscular canine with a heavy bone structure.

Is This Your Breed?

The French Bulldog’s teeth and claws need regular attention. Rubbing the dog’s coat each day with a rough textured rag is advisable. Sparse exercise is needed.

Coat

The fur is middling fine, short, and flat.

Color

The three fur colors are fawn, brindle, and pied.

Locomotion

The proper motion is double tracking.

Personality

This breed gets on well with other pets. They are good dogs for children. They are alert and full of curiosity.

The Beagle

The Beagle is one of those dog breeds that thrive off human companionship. A very amiable animal that was originally bred to be a pack hunter, the Beagle is an enthusiastic adventure seeker. The ideal playtime for this dog would be rummaging and exploring through forests and wooded areas. He absolutely adores his owner and makes a great social house pet.

Although the Beagle needs daily exercise to keep him calm and happy, it does not take much, perhaps 20 to 30 minutes of walking each day. You will find that this dog breed is an excellent house pet who remains gentle and calm, especially around its family members.  A perfect choice, if you have children in the house, owning a Beagle, is a breed that will make you happy and will never stop looking for ways to please you.

Upkeep And Maintenance

As mentioned above, exercise on a daily basis should be a part of the Beagle’s physical upkeep.  Take them out for a long walk or a quick run through a safe area in the woods.  He particularly loves to scout trails and other small paths. However, be sure not to take this dog out off leash if he has been boarded up in the house for a long time.  If he catches the sense of a small animal through a trail, he is liable to dash off and run around for a long period of time, especially if his energy reserves are built up from non-activity.

Health Information

When owning a Beagle, veterinarians suggest that you request specific tests for eye problems, hip dysplasia, potential knee problems, and thyroid. The major health concerns that are widespread with many Beagle is CHD and intervertebral disk disease.

Most Beagles have a long lifespan of between 10 and 15 years but occasionally have minor health issues to watch out for which are cherry eye,  epilepsy, glaucoma, Patellar luxation, KCS, chondrodysplasia, and hypothyroidism.

History

Some think that the Beagle was already a separate breed before the Romans hit Britain and these dogs may have originated in France and Greece. By the era of the crusades, he was a standard hunting dog and during the 14th century, the English upper class kept packs of them for hunting.

General Looks

The Beagle looks like a little foxhound. His droopy ears sit low and are somewhat long. His eyes are big and hazel. He is large for his height.

Is This Your Breed?

These dogs have a chipper temperament. They would whistle, if they could. They are social and are great for family dogs. Their size is condensed and the short fur is easily cared for. Beagles like other canines and people for company. They like some activity each day and they sometimes sniff into monkey business as they pursue their noses lead.

Height and Weight

There are two heights for Beagles: 13 inches high or shorter dogs that weigh 18 pounds and the 15 inches or shorter ones that weigh in at 30 pounds. Their temperament, color, and markings are identical.

Coat

The coat is snug against the body, firm, and medium in length. It is defective, if it is soft or too short and sparse.

Color

The colors normally thought of as Beagle ones are are tan and black with white.

Personality

He has a zestful attitude. Beagles aren’t normally timid or nervous.

The Poodle is ranked in the top 10 of the AKC’s most registered dog breed. Originally used to retrieve small game from water surfaces, the Poodle has become a cozy companion in today’s family households. This dog breed has been mistakenly thought of as having roots from France, however, Central Asia is the actual location in which the Poodle made its start.

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